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Bargaining and Tipping

Bargaining and Tipping

  Shopping in Myanmar is a wonderful experience. Not only can one bargain with storeowners as one would in many countries, but bartering is also acceptable and recommended.

Bargaining and Tipping
 

Shopping in Myanmar is a wonderful experience. Not only can one bargain with storeowners as one would in many countries, but bartering is also acceptable and recommended. Often, merchants are more than happy to trade their wares for some of your own personal items such as designer watches, calculators, jeans, T-shirts and so on. In the larger towns, bargains can be found at public markets, known as zei or zay or at main central markets in most areas known as zeigyo or zay-cho.

 

Do be advised that there is no trading standards authority in Myanmar, so check the quality of what you’re buying very carefully, especially if there are safety concerns involved. Don’t expect to get your money back if you change your mind after making a purchase, or even if you realize that the goods you have been sold are not as advertised.

 

Tipping, as known in the Western countries, is not customary in Myanmar, though little extra ‘presents’ are sometimes expected (even if they’re not asked for) in exchange for a service (such as unlocking a locked temple at Bagan, helping move a bag at the airport or showing you around the ‘sights’ of a village).

 

It’s a good idea to keep some small notes (K50, K100, K200) when visiting a religious temple or monastery, as donations may be asked for. Also, you may wish to leave a donation.

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